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Abstract Detail


Society for Economic Botany/BSA Economic Botany Section

Ghorbani, Abdolbaset [1], Langenberger, Gerhard [1], Sauerborn, Joachim [1].

Comparision of medicinal and food plant use among Lahu and Hani ethnic minorities in SW China.

Naban River Watershed National Nature Reserve(NRWNNR) located in Xishuangbanna Prefecture, SW China, is rich in biocultural diversity. The Nature Reserve comprises approximately 30 villages and a total population of more than 5000 people and is managed based on "the Man and Biosphere" concept of IUCN. Lahu are living in 12 villages and Hani in 7 villages in highlands of the area. Ethnobotanical survey was conducted to document and analyze the knowledge of plant use among Lahu and Hani. Data collection was done through conducting freelisting interviews, semi-structured interviews, field walks and botanical sample collections. Botanical samples were identified scientifically and cultural importance of useful plants has been calculated. A total of 93 species of wild food and 289 medicinal species are used by Lahu and 143 species of food plants and 199 species of medicinal plants by Hani. Most culturally important food plants for Lahu are Diplaziumesculentum (Retz.) Sw. (Salient Index: 0.58), Musa acuminata Colla(0.56), Houttuynia cordata Thunb. (0.34) and Piper longum L. (0.26)and for Hani are Diplazium esculentum (Retz.) Sw. (0.51), Oenanthejavanica (Bl.) L. (0.43), Solanum americanum Mill. (0.38) and Musaacuminata Colla. (0.36). Most salient medicinal plants for Lahu include Aristolochiasp. (0.19), Fibraurea recisa Pierre (0.12), Helicteresangustifolia L. (0.09) and among Hani are Dendrobium crepidatum Lindl.ex Paxt. (0.41), Aristolochia sp. (0.31), Microstegium ciliatum (Trin.)A. Camus (0.13) and Eupatorium coelestinum L. (0.12). Used plants were categorized based on habitats and collection sites. The results show that although Lahu and Hani are living in the same area with similar vegetation, patterns of plant use are not very similar. Both minorities use anthropogenic vegetations as main source of food plants whereas most of the medicinal plants are collected from collective or secondary forest. The presented data could be used in land use planning and management as well as sustainable harvest planning in the area.

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This abstract is part of the work done for LILAC project in SW China


1 - Institute for Plant production and Agroecology in the Tropics and Subt, Uni. Hohenheim, Garbenstr. 13, Stuttgart, Baden-Wurtemberg, 70599, Germany
2 - Institute for Plant production and Agroecology in the Tropics and Subt, Uni. Hohenheim, Garbenstr. 13, Stuttgart, Baden-Wurtemberg, 70599, Germany

Keywords:
Lahu people
Ethnoecology
Wild plant use.

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for Sections
Session: P
Location: Khorassan Ballroom/Chase Park Plaza
Date: Monday, July 11th, 2011
Time: 5:45 PM
Number: PEN002
Abstract ID:127


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