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Abstract Detail


Systematics Section

Nazaire, Mare [1], Hufford, Larry [2].

A broad phylogenetic analysis of Boraginaceae: implications for the relationships of Mertensia.

Mertensia (Boraginaceae) comprises approximately 45 species in both Asia and North America. The phylogenetic relationships of Mertensia are uncertain, and taxonomists have placed it in various tribes of subfamily Boraginoideae, with the most recent placement in Trigonotideae. The present study applies molecular phylogenetic methods to test the monophyly and closest relatives of Mertensia. We used DNA sequence data from the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (nr-ITS) region and four chloroplast (cp) regions (matK, ndhF, rbcL, trnL-trnF) to examine the placement of over 70 new accessions representing over 25 species of Mertensia and accessions from approximately 70% of Boraginaceae genera obtained from GenBank. Preliminary phylogenetic reconstructions using maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood analyses show a topology largely congruent with previous molecular phylogenetic analyses of Boraginaceae, which had used far fewer taxa. We recovered Mertensia as monophyletic and among its closest relatives was a clade consisting of Myosotidium and Omphalodes. Results from our broad sampling of the Boraginaceae provide insights on the major clades of the family and have important ramifications for the taxonomy of subfamily Boraginoideae.

Broader Impacts:


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1 - Washington State University, School of Biological Sciences, 312 Abelson Hall, P.O. Box 644236, Pullman, WA, 99164-4236, USA
2 - Washington State University, SCHOOL OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, 312 Abelson Hall, PULLMAN, WA, 99164-4236, USA

Keywords:
Asteridae
Boraginaceae
Boraginoideae
maximum likelihood
Mertensia
phylogenetics.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for Sections
Session: 27
Location: Lindell A/Chase Park Plaza
Date: Tuesday, July 12th, 2011
Time: 8:30 AM
Number: 27001
Abstract ID:212


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