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Abstract Detail


Systematics Section

Stull, Gregory W. [1], Johnson, David [2], Soltis, Pamela [3].

A preliminary molecular phylogeny of the pantropical genus Xylopia (Annonaceae): implications for character evolution and historical biogeography.

The Annonaceae, a pantropical family of trees, shrubs, and lianas within the Magnoliales, are an ecologically important and diverse constituent of wet lowland tropical forests. Although molecular studies over the past 10 years have made considerable progress in resolving broad-scale phylogenetic patterns within the family, several large clades within the family remain poorly understood in terms of their phylogenetic relationships. For example, Xylopia, the second largest genus in the family (with approximately 180 spp), is a phylogenetically poorly understood group despite its biogeographic significance as the only pantropical genus within the family. Here we present a preliminary phylogeny of Xylopia based on the chloroplast genes ndhF, psbA-trnH, trnL-F and ycf1. These data confirm that Xylopia is monophyletic and sister to Artabotrys, as has been suggested by previous analyses. A new hypothesis presented here is that the ancestors of the genus likely possessed stilt roots and occurred in swamp or riverine habitats. Additional implications for historical biogeography and character evolution are discussed.

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1 - University of Florida, Florida Museum of Natural History, Dickinson Hall, Gainesville, FL, 32611, USA
2 - OHIO WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY, DEPT OF BOTANY-MICROBIOLOGY, Department Of Botany Microbiology, DELAWARE, OH, 43015, USA
3 - University Of Florida, Florida Museum Of Natural History, PO BOX 117800, Gainesville, FL, 32611-7800, USA

Keywords:
molecular phylogenetics
Annonaceae
Biogeography
character evolution.

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for Sections
Session: P
Location: Khorassan Ballroom/Chase Park Plaza
Date: Monday, July 11th, 2011
Time: 5:30 PM
Number: PSY009
Abstract ID:354


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